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uncooked rice?

Ok so I put dinner in the crock pot a few hours ago and the rice doesn't seem to be cooking well... you can put uncooked rice in a crockpot - riiiiight?

Sorry for the stupid question... I'm not a crockpot newbie but this is the first time I've tried using rice.

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( 28 comments — Leave a comment )
xfyresprytex
Oct. 6th, 2009 06:54 am (UTC)
I've put uncooked rice in the crock and it turned out just fine. Though I do tend to cook things for 8 to 10 hours.
ursy_ten
Oct. 6th, 2009 08:46 am (UTC)
I think it might depend on how much liquid is in your recipe. I also find it doesn't cook so well if the sauce is too thick. Maybe it prevents the rice from absorbing the water or something...
theo_harrison
Oct. 6th, 2009 10:55 am (UTC)
You can. I've had best results with a watery sauce (I used the rice to soak up the extra stock I put in by accident - but you didn't hear that, right?)

TBH though, I often cook my rice through first (usually do extra with the previous day's meal) and add it close to the end, because I've had hit and miss results in the slow cooker.
hockeyraven
Oct. 6th, 2009 11:17 am (UTC)
This seemed as good a place as any to ask.
What about cooking rice, just plain rice, in the crock pot without any extras? I have not had a lot of luck cooking rice the normal ways. I tried on the stove, but my only pan with a "tight fitting lid" didn't have a tight enough fitting lid, and it boiled over and was a big mess. My microwavable rice did much the same, except in a more confined space. I don't have room to buy and store a rice-cooker.
So, I was wondering if maybe the crock pot would work better?
mrs_picasso
Oct. 6th, 2009 12:31 pm (UTC)
I think the book "Not your mother's slow cooker" explains how to cook rice. Also, "Slow cooking for dummies" probably does. I got both of these books from my library so they should be easy to find.
fallconsmate
Oct. 6th, 2009 01:02 pm (UTC)
my granny taught me to make rice on the stove, and as long as i follow her directions, i've never had a boilover.

1 cup of rice.
2 cups of water.

bring the rice to a boil. CUT THE HEAT OFF. put the lid on and leave the thing alone for 20 minutes. do NOT raise the lid, SMACK the hands of whoever messes with it. (wooden spoon. very memorable, even to husbands. *wink*)

i have a mini rice cooker that works for shite. i'm gonna go back to the "old ways" and hope for better. :)
paixmaker
Oct. 6th, 2009 04:22 pm (UTC)
This is my exact method, right down to the hand smacking, and it always comes out perfect. ;P
fallconsmate
Oct. 6th, 2009 04:24 pm (UTC)
hee! granny for the win!

and my first husband was REALLY bad about the lifting of the lid...finally i told him that if he didnt stop messing about with things when i was cooking...HE was going to have to cook. he carefully avoided the kitchen after that. ;)
paixmaker
Oct. 6th, 2009 04:42 pm (UTC)
This is completely OT, but the thing that drives me MOST crazy is that my husband will taste WHILE cutting the meat/serving the food on to the plates....like it's impossible for him to wait the extra what...two minutes? It drives me Batty, I tell you.
magpiefirefly
Oct. 6th, 2009 11:04 pm (UTC)
MINE TOO. If he'd stop eating it while I was trying to serve it, it would be served quicker!


And I've cooked rice in the crock with thin broth, but if I have the 30 minutes, this is what I do. If my husband is cooking, we have 10 minute rice. They even have 90 second microwave rice. The benefit of not putting it in the crock is if you don't eat the whole dish, you can use the rice in another.
carodee
Oct. 6th, 2009 02:31 pm (UTC)
*cough* Not a crockpot recipe, but I've had good results with cooking rice like spaghetti, i.e., in a full pot of water and then draining the rice when it's the right texture. You'll never have a scorched pot again. Do put in the oil or butter to keep the starch-filled water from being able to bubble if that's still a problem.
lefin1
Oct. 6th, 2009 10:46 pm (UTC)
That's the way I cook rice. Then I run it through a colander to get rid of whatever extra water. Just like pasta. Exactly like pasta.
stargazersilent
Oct. 8th, 2009 12:07 am (UTC)
You can try rinsing the rice in cold water beforehand to get rid of some of the starch, and it reduces the bubbling problem... It also turns your result into stickier rice. :)
carodee
Oct. 8th, 2009 12:14 am (UTC)
Thanks. I'll try that. The whole bubbling over thing is a drag. *g*
rockbirthedme
Oct. 6th, 2009 04:31 pm (UTC)
Number one, are you sure you're using a big enough pot? It should be no more than half full. Second, keep an eagle eye on it. The second it starts to simmer, turn it all the way down. Third, ignore the bit about a tight-fitting lid. As soon as you turn the rice down, tip the lid a bit for ventilation. That will keep the rice from boiling over, and the rice will cook just fine.
hockeyraven
Oct. 6th, 2009 09:57 pm (UTC)
I hope it's a big enough pot, I try not to overfill it. I have limited storage space, so I go directly from medium saucepan/pot to dutch oven size-wise. I hadn't vented it before, thanks for the tip.
faithful_summer
Oct. 6th, 2009 05:26 pm (UTC)
Rinsing your rice first helps immensely with the boiling over issue.
hockeyraven
Oct. 6th, 2009 09:56 pm (UTC)
Hmm, hadn't heard that one before. Thanks.
faithful_summer
Oct. 6th, 2009 10:09 pm (UTC)
It's due to the starches that collect on the hulls of the rice. Rinse in a fine strainer or swirl in a bowl of water several times until the water runs clear.
stargazersilent
Oct. 8th, 2009 12:08 am (UTC)
This is what Samurai Sam's does to get their sticky rice. But - turns cheapo rice into sticky rice too, and improves the taste, imo. :)
anais_pf
Oct. 6th, 2009 10:43 pm (UTC)
Another method you might try is to cook your rice on the stovetop in a large amount of boiling water, the same way you might boil potatoes. At the end of the cooking time, simply drain the rice through a sieve.
brenda_k_a
Oct. 9th, 2009 05:31 pm (UTC)
I now cook a crockpot full of rice and then divide it into freezer bags so that I always have cooked rice on hand when I want it. Just google crockpot rice. You will find various methods for cooking it in the crockpot.
kestrel127
Oct. 6th, 2009 01:00 pm (UTC)
I often put a cup of uncooked rice into the crockpot for stew/soup recipes, but I make sure to add an extra 2 cups liquid to make up for it. Rice tends to cook in about 4 hours on high, 8 on low.
jlbooth76
Oct. 6th, 2009 02:30 pm (UTC)
Not a stupid question- good question!

I recently tried to make a batch of beans & rice, but timed things wrong and ended up with crunchy beans and rice that had gone to mush. {sigh, dump in compost pile, try again some other time}
rockbirthedme
Oct. 6th, 2009 04:33 pm (UTC)
You have to have enough liquid, and liquid-y enough liquid, if you know what I mean. You also have to be patient. I've put rice in soups and so forth in my slow cooker and had it take hours.
black_raven135
Oct. 6th, 2009 05:02 pm (UTC)
Depends on what type of rice and how much liquid you have in the pot.
If it long grain white rice, e.g. basmati or jasmine it should cook in 15 minutes.
I never eat white rice anymore, prefer short grain brown rice,
but know that long grain white is fast cooking.
What I would NOT do is use that horrible instant stuff they pass off as white 'rice'..........
Just make certain you have enough liquid in your pot to hydrate it
black_raven135
Oct. 6th, 2009 05:03 pm (UTC)
BTW it is NOT stupid to ask a question
That is what communities are for, not just posting stuff.
cmmunchkin
Oct. 6th, 2009 09:24 pm (UTC)
I often dump some rice in soups that I made in the crock. I think if there is enough liquid it should be okay.
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